The SARE Mission 

The Summer Academic Research Experience (SARE) seeks to develop exceptional high school students, typically from disadvantaged backgrounds (low income, single parent household, a parent incarcerated or suffering from addiction, abuse, and/or homelessness), by introducing them to biomedical research. The students who go through the program are known as “SARE Scholars”.  To date, 100% of our scholars to have reached college age have matriculated into 4-year college programs with 100% receiving partial or full financial support, and 50% have chosen STEM or health-related majors.  The most senior SARE scholar alum is currently applying to medical school, and another is considering graduate doctoral programs upon college graduation.

SARE provides its scholars with a unique exposure to modern scientific research, combined with additional tutoring to fortify basic academic skills. The rationale is that many disadvantaged youth have not been exposed to an environment where creative and critical thinking skills are highlighted, where being smart and working hard are considered “cool”, where substantial academic accomplishment is celebrated, and where colleagues of all levels are ready to help when one needs it. Laboratories within academic research universities cultivate this type of environment. Therefore, we leverage this environment and utilize our science in outreach to this younger group of students. While research universities already have many outreach programs, most target the undergraduate and post-baccalaureate levels. Through SARE, Johns Hopkins targets adolescents at a critical age in an intensive manner, allowing for substantial impact that will carry on through these students’ lives.  
 
Baltimore is an area of great need. Approximately 34% of children in Baltimore City grow up in poverty, which is nearly three times higher than the national rate (13%). Situated in East Baltimore, SARE provides a conduit for promising, disadvantaged students to achieve the academic and professional skills as well as the network needed to succeed.
 
Please see Program Features to learn about the facets of SARE, including its four pillars: Mentoring, Professionalism, Research, and Academic Fortification.
 
For a downloadable, short description of SARE, click here
 
We thank our Supporters: 
 
We thank our partnering organizations: 
 
Announcements:
June 21, 2016: We were awarded a grant from the Thomas Wilson Foundation for the Children of Baltimore.  Thank you, TWF!
 

​June 20, 2016: 15 SARE scholars (14 new and one returning) started today!

Aug 17, 2015: We received word today that we were awarded a ~$2M Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP) grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA).   With this grant, we will now double our number of students at the high school level (to >25 students/yr between SARE and our partnering program BRBT, which is another Hopkins high school program that shares our goals and values).  We will also expand to include undergraduates (~17/yr) from disadvantaged backgrounds as part of the Summer Internship Program (SIP).  We will also create a new program, the Doctoral Diversity Program (DDP), which will provide a 1-year mentored research and career development opportunity to 5 postbaccalaureate students annually.  To accomplish this, we have assembled a wonderful team of Johns Hopkins Faculty and Staff who will help make this happen.  Our overall goal is to establish a pipeline program to prepare students from disadvantaged backgrounds to be able to pursue advanced degrees in medical and STEM fields.  Overall, this is a massive, comprehensive effort in which we will be impacting 48, 52, and 56 students in 2016, 2017, and 2018, respectively.    
 
Jul 30, 2015: Check out Assefa Akinwole's CARES Symposium Talk.
 
Four more scholars will matriculate into college this fall (2015). 
1. Christopher Miller will attend Allegheny College as a mathematics major and on a full-ride scholarship from the National Science Foundation.
2. Stephanie Keyaka will attend Penn State, majoring in political science, and will be in the Schreyer Honors Program.
3. Diana Bobb will major in chemistry or biology at the University of Dayton and received scholarship and grant suppor from the university.
4. De'Sean Markley will attend Furman University and major in chemistry or biology.  De'Sean also received considerable financial support. 
 
Please get involved:
If you are interested in helping support SARE, please contact Doug Robinson (dnr@jhmi.edu) or Geminesse Johnson, Associate Director of Development, Institute for Basic Biomedical Sciences (gjohns45@jhmi.edu).